Twitter is Good for the Heart

By Ryan Mccann
Wednesday, 17 April, 2013

Twitter, the new social trend, can be a powerful tool to help prevent heart disease and improve health practices, according to a group of researchers affiliated with the University of Sydney.
Their study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, surveying 15 international health-focused Twitter accounts, nine professional organisations and six medical journals, were selected for analysis of their Twitter growth, reach, and content.
The study showed that, through its inherent networking, social media sites like Twitter have the potential to enhance education, awareness and overall management of cardiovascular disease.
Lead author, Associate Professor Julie Redfern, of The George Institute for Global Health, said the researchers examined the reach of health-related Tweets via the re-tweeting trend.
"The popularity and rise of Twitter has made it a readily available, free, and user-friendly tool to disseminate information rapidly to a diverse audience, for example, to engage health professionals and heart attack survivors," she said.
"In recent years, a growing number of health professionals have been using social media to share information. In a survey of 485 oncologists and physicians, 24 per cent used social media at least daily to scan or explore medical information.
"Exponential growth in internet use and smart phone ownership has seen the rapid expansion of social media interfaces, such as Twitter, for rapid and global information sharing.
"We noted that Twitter is becoming increasingly popular where Tweets often include links to more detailed health information via story links, websites and photographs."
Senior author, Professor Chris Semsarian from the University of Sydney and the Centenary Institute, said recent studies had also reported significant growth in the use of Twitter for social networking and micro-blogging about medical information, including quitting smoking and managing epileptic seizures.
"The unique ability of Twitter to disseminate critical information quickly has also been attributed to saving many lives during the recent earthquakes in Japan.
"Our study sought to investigate the growth, reach, and content of Twitter accounts for international professional organisations and prominent scientific journals associated with cardiovascular medicine."

Related News

Lumia Care acquires nursing agency Healthcare HQ

Founded by registered nurse Angela Thwaites, Healthcare HQ offers nurses contract and other roles...

Australia's oldest hospital awarded Nightingale Badge

The badge is awarded to individuals and institutions who have made an exceptional contribution to...

Speedier assessment for internationally trained nurses

Overseas-trained nurses and midwives looking to practise in Australia will soon have access to a...


  • All content Copyright © 2024 Westwick-Farrow Pty Ltd